Understanding the Nexus between Alcohol Consumption, Social and Emotional Wellbeing, and higher Education Outcomes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Males in Australia

Main Article Content

Himanshu Gupta
James A. Smith
Jesse J. Fleay
Christopher P.B. Lesiter
Kootsy Canuto

Abstract

Education is a critical social determinant of health, particularly in the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander health and well-being. There is also a broad array of other health risk factors that intersect with these social and cultural determinants of health. Overall, an in-depth examination of the complex health–education nexus is needed. This paper provides a commentary on interrelationships between health risk factors, their impact on education trajectories, and their implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Himanshu Gupta, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

Research Fellow, Alcohol, Other Drugs and Gambling team, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Research Fellow, Freemasons Centre for Male Health and Wellbeing – Northern Territory, Menzies School of
Health Research, NT
Adjunct Research Fellow, National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

James A. Smith, Menzies School of Health Research

Director, Freemasons Centre for Male Health and Wellbeing – Northern Territory, Menzies School of Health Research, NT
Head, Alcohol, Other Drugs and Gambling Team, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin
University, NT
Adjunct Professorial Fellow, National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education, Curtin University, WA

Jesse J. Fleay, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

Lecturer, Teaching and Research Scholar, Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

Doctoral Candidate, School of Philosophy and Theology, University of Notre Dame Fremantle, Western Australia

Christopher P.B. Lesiter, Murdoch University, Western Australia

9Graduate Researcher, School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Western Australia

Kootsy Canuto, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute. The University of Adelaide

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men's Health Wardliparingga Aboriginal Health Equity, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute

Adjunct Fellow, Adelaide Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide

References

1. Behrendt L, Larkin S, Griew R, Kelly P. Review of higher education access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: Final report. Australian Government; 2012.
2. Halsey J. Independent review into regional, rural and remote education. Flinders University; 2018.
3. Pollard L. Remote student university success: An analysis of policy and practice. National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education; 2018.
4. Department of Education and Training. Selected higher education statistics—2015 Student data: Appendix 5—Equity performance data. 2016.
5. Department of Education and Training (DET). HEIMS reporting checklist—HEIMSHELP 2017 [Internet]. Available from: http://heimshelp.education.gov.au/ sites/heimshelp/resources/pages/reportingchecklist#nav
6. Nakata M, Nakata V, Day A, Peachey M. Closing gaps in Indigenous undergraduate higher education outcomes: Repositioning the role of student support services to improve retention and completion rates. Aust J Indigen Educ. 2019;48(1):1–11. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jie.2017.36
7. Frawley J, Smith J, Larkin S. Beyond bradley and behrendt: Building a stronger evidence-base about Indigenous pathways and transitions into higher education. Learn Commun. 2015;17:8–11. http://dx.doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.17.01
8. Smith J, Trinidad S, Larkin S. Participation in higher education in Australia among under-represented groups: What can we learn from the Higher Education Participation Programme to better support Indigenous learners. Learn Commun. 2015;17:12–29. http://dx.doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.17.02
9. Frawley J, Larkin S, Smith J. Indigenous pathways, transitions and participation in higher education: From policy to practice. Frawley J, Larkin S, Smith J, editors. Singapore: Springer Nature; 2017. 3–11 p.
10. Smith J, Trinidad S, Larkin S. Understanding the nexus between equity and Indigenous higher educa-tion policy agendas in Australia. In: Frawley J, Larkin S, Smith J, editors. Indigenous pathways, transitions and participation in higher education: From policy to practice. Singapore: Springer Nature; 2017.
11. National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium (NATIHEC). Report for the Australian Government Department of Education and Training to accelerate education and employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the higher education sector. 2018.
12. Rich J. Moving toward healing: Trauma and violence and boys and young men of color. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; 2016.
13. Griffith DM. An intersectional approach to men’s health. J Mens Health. 2012;9(2):106–12. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jomh.2012.03.003
14. Griffith DM, Metzl JM, Gunter K. Considering in-tersections of race and gender in interventions that address US men’s health disparities. Public Health. 2011;125(7):417–23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2011.04.014
15. Griffith D, Bruce M, Thorpe R. Men’s health equity: A handbook. D. Griffith MBRT, editor. New York: Routledge; 2019.
16. Stahl G, McDonald S, Stokes J. “I see myself as undeveloped”: Supporting Indigenous first-in-family males in the transition to higher education. High Educ Res Dev. 2020:1–14.
17. Australian Bureau of Statistics. National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey 2014–15 [Internet]. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2016. Available from: https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4714.0Main+Features100022014-15?OpenDocument
18. Harvey A, Burnheim C, Brett M. Student equity in Australian higher education: Twenty-five years of a fair chance for all. Singapore: Springer; 2016.
19. Shalley F, Smith J, Wood D, Fredericks B, Robertson K, Larkin S. Understanding completion rates of Indig-enous Higher Education Students from two regional universities: A cohort analysis. National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education; 2019.
20. Crenshaw KW. Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory and antiracist politics. Univ Chicago Legal Forum. 1989;1989:138–67.
21. Hankivsky O. Intersectionality 101. The Institute for Intersectionality Research & Policy, SFU; 2014.
22. Christensen A-D, Jensen SQ. Combining hegemonic masculinity and intersectionality. NORMA. 2014;9(1):60–75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/18902138.2014.892289
23. Griffith D, Gunter K, Allen J. A systematic approach to developing contextual, culturally, and gender sensitive interventions for African American men: The example of men 4 health. In: Elk R, Landrine H, editors. Cancer disparities: Causes and evidence-based solutions. New York: Springer Publishing; 2012.
24. Griffith DM, Ellis KR, Allen JO. An intersectional approach to social determinants of stress for African American men: Men’s and women’s perspectives. Am J Mens Health. 2013;7(4 Suppl):19–30s. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1557988313480227
25. Watkins DC, Allen JO, Goodwill JR, Noel B. Strengths and weaknesses of the Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) Facebook project. Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2017;87(4):392–401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ort0000229
26. Goodwill JR, Watkins DC, Johnson NC, Allen JO. An exploratory study of stress and coping among Black college men. Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2018;88(5):538–49. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ort0000313
27. Smith JA, Watkins DC, Griffith DM. Equity, gender and health: New directions for global men’s health promotion. Health Promot J Aust. 2020;31(2):161–5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpja.337
28. Fleay J, Judd B. The Uluru statement. Int J Crit Indigen Stud. 2019;12(1):1–14. http://dx.doi.org/10.5204/ijcis.v12i1.532
29. Mazel O. Self-determination and the right to health: Australian Aboriginal Community controlled health services. Hum Rights Law Rev. 2016;16(2):323–55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hrlr/ngw010
30. Tracey D, Craven RG, Yeung AS, Tregeagle S, Burnstein J, Stanley H. A place to learn: Cultivating engaging learning environments for young rural Aboriginal Australians. Int J Inclus Educ. 2016;20(6):641–58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13603116.2015.1102341
31. Smith JA, Watkins DC, Griffit DM. Reducing health inequities facing boys and young men of colour in the United States. Health Promotion International; 2020.
32. White V, Mason T, Briggs V. How do trends in smok-ing prevalence among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian secondary students between 1996 and 2005 compare? Aust N Z J Public Health. 2009;33(2):147–53. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00362.x
33. Ferguson R. Aiming higher together: Strategizing better educational outcomes for boys and young men of color. Research report prepared by Malcolm Wiener Centre for Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Urban Institute; 2016.
34. Gebhard A. Schools, prisons and Aboriginal youth: Making connections. J Educ Controversy. 2013;7(1):Article 4.
35. Sikora J, Biddle N. How gendered is ambition? Educational and occupational plans of Indigenous youth in Australia. Int J Educ Dev. 2015;42:1–13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2015.02.011
36. Godsil R. Tools for addressing the disproportionate discipline of boys of color in schools. Prepared for RISE for boys and men of color. n.d.
37. Dallmann-Jones A. A case for separate at-risk education standards. J School Improv. 2002;3(1):34–8.
38. Martin D, Martin M, Gibson SS, Wilkins J. Increasing prosocial behavior and academic achievement among adolescent African American males. Adolescence. 2007;42(168):689–98.
39. Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision. Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage: Key indicators 2011. 2011.
40. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Table generated 5 January 2014 from the 2011 census of population and housing, table builder [Internet]. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics; 2011. Available from: http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/censushome.nsf/home/tablebuilder?opendocument&navpos=240
41. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. The health of Australia’s males: A focus on five population groups [Internet]. Cat. No. PHE160. 2012. Available from: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/men-women/health-australias-males-five-population-groups/contents/table-of-contents
42. Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet. Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status, 2017. Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.; 2018.
43. Smith JA, Adams M, Bonson J. Investing in men’s health in Australia. Med J Aust. 2018;208(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja17.00173
44. Gwyther K, Swann R, Casey K, Purcell R, Rice SM. Developing young men’s wellbeing through community and school-based programs: A systematic review. PLoS One. 2019;14(5):e0216955. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0216955
45. Innes R, Anderson K, Cariou W, Tengan P, Hokowhitu B. Indigenous men and masculinities: Legacies, identi-ties, regeneration. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press; 2015.
46. Ireland S, Smith J. Health literacy across the life course: Understanding equity and the influence of culture and gender. In: Midford R, Nutton G, Hyndman B, Silburn S, editors. Health and education interdependence. Singapore: Springer; 2020.
47. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Alcohol and other drug use in regional and remote Australia: Consumption, harms and access to treatment, 2016–17. Contract No.: Cat. no. HSE 212. 2019.
48. Australian Bureau of Statistics. The health and welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cat. no. 4704.0. Canberra: ABS; 2010.
49. Hallett J, Howat PM, Maycock BR, McManus A, Kypri K, Dhaliwal SS. Undergraduate student drinking and related harms at an Australian university: Web-based survey of a large random sample. BMC Public Health. 2012;12(1):37. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-37
50. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) 2016 key findings [Internet]. 2017. Available from: http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data-sources/ndshs-2016/alcohol/
51. Stafford J, Keric D. Alcohol in the university setting: A resource to support Australian universities. McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth; 2017.
52. Smith J, Whetton S, d’Abbs P. The social and economic costs and harms of alcohol consumption in the NT. Menzies School of Health Research; 2019.
53. Arria AM, Garnier-Dykstra LM, Caldeira KM, Vincent KB, Winick ER, O’Grady KE. Drug use patterns and continuous enrollment in college: Results from a longitudinal study. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2013;74(1):71–83. http://dx.doi.org/10.15288/jsad.2013.74.71
54. Hemphill SA, Heerde JA, Scholes-Balog KE, Herren-kohl TI, Toumbourou JW, Catalano RF, Jr. Effects of early adolescent alcohol use on mid-adolescent school performance and connection: A longitudinal study of students in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States. J School Health. 2014;84(11):706–15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12201
55. Crosnoe R, Benner AD, Schneider B. Drinking, socioemo-tional functioning, and academic progress in secondary school. J Health Social Behav. 2012;53(2):150–64. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022146511433507
56. Latvala A, Rose RJ, Pulkkinen L, Dick DM, Korhonen T, Kaprio J. Drinking, smoking, and educational achievement: Cross-lagged associations from adolescence to adulthood. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014;137:106–13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.01.016
57. Balsa AI, Giuliano LM, French MT. The effects of alcohol use on academic achievement in high school. Econ Educ Rev. 2011;30(1):1–15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2010.06.015
58. Australian Bureau of Statistics. National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey 2014–15. 2016.
59. Silins E, Fergusson DM, Patton GC, Horwood LJ, Olsson CA, Hutchinson DM, et al. Adolescent substance use
and educational attainment: An integrative data analysis comparing cannabis and alcohol from three Australasian cohorts. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015;156:90–6. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.08.034
60. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Alcohol and other drug use in regional and remote Australia: Consumption, harms and access to treatment, 2016–17. 2019.
61. Calma T. Social determinants and the health of Indig-enous peoples in Australia—A human rights based approach. In: International Symposium on the Social Determinants of Indigenous Health. 2007.
62. Australian Psychological Society. Australian Psychological Society apologises to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2016 [Internet]. 2016. Available from: https://www.psychology.org.au/news/
63. The social and economic costs and harms of alcohol consumption in the NT [press release]. 2019.
64. Parker R, Milroy H. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health: An overview. In: Dudgeon P, editor. Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice. 2014. p. 25–39.
65. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011. Australian Burden of Disease Study series no. 6. Cat. no. BOD 7. Canberra; 2016.
66. Griffiths K, Coleman C, Lee V, Madden R. How colonisa-tion determines social justice and Indigenous health—A review of the literature. J Popul Res. 2016;33(1):9–30. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12546-016-9164-1
67. Zubrick SR, Dudgeon P, Gee G, Glaskin B, Kelly K, Paradies Y, et al. Social determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social and emotional wellbeing. In: Dudgeon P, Milroy H, Walker R, editors. Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice. 2014.
68. Smith J, Christie B, Tari-Keresztes N, Gupta H, Stephens D, Wallace T, et al. Final report: Promising practice approaches to improve the social and emotional wellbeing of young Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people with severe and complex mental health needs. 2019.
69. Gupta H, Tari-Keresztes N, Stephens D, Smith JA, Sultan E, Lloyd S. A scoping review about social and emotional wellbeing programs and services targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in Australia: Understanding the principles guiding prom-ising practice. BMC Public Health. 2020;20(1):1625. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-09730-1
70. Fogarty W, Lovell M, Langenberg J, Heron M-J. Deficit discourse and strengths-based approaches: Changing the narrative of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing. Melbourne: The Lowitja Institute; 2018.
71. Whiteside M, Klieve H, Millgate N, Webb B, Gabriel Z, McPherson L, et al. Connecting and strengthening young Aboriginal men: A family wellbeing pilot study. Aust Soc Work. 2016;69(2):241–52. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0312407X.2015.1137101
72. Rix EF, Wilson S, Sheehan N, Tujague N. Indigenist and decolonizing research methodology. In: Liamputtong P, editor. Handbook of research methods in health social sciences. Singapore: Springer Singapore; 2018. p. 1–15.